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Friday, October 7, 2011

The National Cancer Institute Cancer Program For Prevention and Treatment From 1975 to 2007 - A Dismal Failure


I have assessed the U.S. Natioal Cancer Program for prevention and treatment of various cancers using surgery, radiation and chemotherapy by analyzing the overall incidence and mortality rates of all cancers combined. The statistics used for the analysis are from the period 1975 to 2007 which include 1) the incidence rates of males and females, 2) the number of Americans afficted with a cancer, 3) the mortality rates of males and females and 4) the number of Americans who died from a cancer.

Two criteria were used to assess the progam of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in preventing cancer: thie incidence rate and the number of Americans afflicted by a cancer. A constant or increasing incidence rate over time, along with increasednumbers of those afflited indicates a dismal failure of the NCI program in the prevention of cancer. Also, if the incidence rate declines but the number of people afflicted increases, the NCI prevention program is deemed a dismal failure. A declining incidence rate, along with a declining number of those diagnosed with any specific cancer, however, indicates succes in the prevention of cancer.

The criteria used to assess the treatment side of the NCI program were the mortality rate and the numbers of Americans died from a specific cancer. A constant or increasing mortality rate of a cancer over time, along with increased numbers of deaths, indicates a failure of the NCI program in the treatment of cancer.

Also, if the mortality rate declines over time but the number of deaths increases, the NCI program for the treatment of that cancer is shown to be a failure. If the mortality rate decolines over time and then number of deaths declines, this indicates success in the treamten of cancer.

I will provide the data over time for 24 specific cancers.

The first cancer which had the highes incidence rate of any other cancer studied is the cancerous condition of the lung and bronchus.

CANCER OF THE LUNG AND BRONCHUS

The overall incidence rate rose from 52 per 100,000 population in 1975 to 61 per 100,000 in 2007.

In 1975, the incidence rate of males was a remarkable 90 per 100,000, much higher than that of females, which was 25 per 100,000. By 2007, the incidence rate of males had declined to 72 per 100,000, while that of females had increased to 53 per 100,000. Consequently, the gap between the tow genders has narrowed over time which may be a result of the increase of tobacco use by females.

Om 1975, the number of Americans diagnosed with lund cancer was 112,867, and by 2007 that number had increased to 180,000. the number of Americans diagnosed with lung cancer during 1975 to 2007 was a shocking total of 5.4 million.

The overall morality rate of lunger was 32.6 in 1975, and that rate increased to 50.7 in 2007. The mortality rate of males in 1975 was 74.5, much higher than that of females, at 17.6, in 2007, the rate of males declined to 65.2, while that of the females increased to 40.

In 1975, 91,918 Americans died from lung cancer using the standard protocols for cancer treatments of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. By 2007, that number jumped to 152,539. the total number of deaths from lung and brochus cancer during this period was a shocking 4.6 million. That number indicates that, on an average, 85% of Americans diagnosed with lung and/or bronchus cancer will die from the cancer and/or the treatment of the cancer. Once again if you are diagnosed with lung or bronchus cancer you have a 15% chance of survival within the first year of diagnosis. After that it drops to ZERO! A VERY DISMAL STATISTIC.

CANCER OF THE LIVER AND INTRAHEPATIC BILE DUCT

The overall incidence rate of liver cancer surged from 2.6 in 1975 to 7.2 in 2007. In 1975, the incidence rate of males was 3.9 per 100,000, while that of females was 1.6 per 100,000. By 1975, the incidence rate of males has increased to 11.2 while that of females increased to 3.8.

The number of Americans diagnosed with liver cancer increased rapidly from 5702 in 1975 to 21,844 in 2007, representing an amazing 285% increase. The total number of Americans diagnosed with liver cancer during 1975 to 2007 was 378,311.

The overall mortality rate of liver cancer increased significantly, from 2.8 per 100,000 population in 1975 to 5.4 per 100,000 in 2007. The mortality rate of males was 3.8 per 100,000 in 1975, while that of the females was 2 per 100,000. By 2007, the rate of mortality for males had increased to 7.9, as compared with 3.2 for females. The faster increase in the mortality rate of the males than of the females over time resulted in a widening gap between the two genders. This I suggest is the increase in alcohol and sugar products in both males and females over time.

The numbers of Americans who died from liver cancer and its treatments increased from 6069 in 1975 to 16,202 in 2007. The total number of deaths from liver cancer during this period reach an all time high of 332,421.

These numbers indicated that on an average, 88% of Americans diagnosed and treated for liver and Intrahepatic bile cancer will die from that cancer and/or its treatment. This means that the survival rate for these cancers within the first year is only 12 percent going to ZERO after 1 year.

LEUKEMIA

The overall incidence rate of leukemia increased from 12.8 per 100,000 population in 1975 to 14 in 2007. Moreover, males had significantly higher incidence rates than females, In 1975, the incidence rate of males was 16.9, while that of females was 10, and by 2007, the rate of males had risen to 18.3, while that of females had increased to 10.8

The number of Americans diagnosed with leukemia increaed significantly from 27,601 in 1975 to 42,270 in 2007. The total numbr of people diagnosed with leukemia during the analysis period totaled 1.1 million.

The overall mortality rate of leukemia decreased from 8.1 in 1975 to 7.0 in 2007. This represents a decline of 0.45% per annum - a very small magnitude.

In addition, the mortality rate of males was 11 in 1975, while that of females was 6, and by 2007, the rate of males was 9.4 while that of females was 5.3.

The number of deaths from leukemia increased from 17, 472 in 1975 to 21,120 in 2007. The total number of daths from leukemia during 1975 to 2007 reached 659,574.

The ratio of those who died from leukemia to those who were diagnosed with that cancerous condition indicates, on average, 58% of Americans diagnosed with leukemia and treated will die from this cancerous condition using the current protocol.

MYELOMA

The overall incidence rate of myeloma increased by 20% over 1975 to 2007, rising from 4.9 per 100,000 to 6.0 per 100,000 in 2007. The incidence rate of males in 1975 was 6.4, while the rate for felmales was 3.9. Over time, the situation for both genders worsened so that by 2007, the incidence rate of males had risen to 7.8, while rate of females had reached 4.6.

The number of Americans diagnosed with myeloma also increased substantially over time from 10,604 in 1975 to 18,012 in 2007, a notable 70% increase. The total number of Americans diangosed with myeloma during the analysis period reached 474, 101.

The overall mortality rate of this cancerous condition rose from 2.9 in 1975 to 3.5 in 2007. With regard to gender, in 1975 the males once again had a higher mortality rate at 3.7 than the females at 2.4. Moreover, the mortality rate of males rose faster than that of females, to reach 4.4 by 2007, while the rate of females increased to 2.8.

The number of Americans who died from this cancerous condition and/or its treatment also increased substantially over time from 6350 in 1975 to 10,469 in 2007. The total number of deaths from myeloma during the analysis period was 305,693. This indicates that on average 64% of Americans diagnosed and treated within the first year will die.

CONCLUSIONS

Increasing mortality rates over 1975 to 2007 of these cancers indicates a failure of the US National Cancer Institute program of cancer prevention and treatment. Currently, there are three basic conventional approaches for the treatment of these cancers, approved by the NCI and the Food and Drug Administration - surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. It is obvious that the use of those modalities have been a failure in the prevention and the treatment of these cancerous conditions.

The failures on both the prevention and the treatment sides call for a basic restructuring of the National Cancer Institute and the US cancer program for prevention and treatment which has been a dismal failure.

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